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, they do have a lot to feel guilty for. it was liberal democrats that were the ones fighting civil rights for 100 years after the civil war in addition to fighting the civil war. and they just write these revisionist histories and then play act themselves being civil rights champions. um, i mean, the quote from bill clinton. on his first inaugural as governor, he was embracing orville -- [inaudible] who stood in the schoolhouse during little rock. democrat bill clinton invites democrat segregationist jay william full bright to the white house to give him the medal of freedom in which he cites fulbright, you know, he teaches us that the russians are people too. but fulbright didn't ever see that black americans were people, too, since he signed the southern manifesto, voted against the '64 civil rights act. cheryl: you really in the book go after politicians, and you say they have used the black community to their own benefit. >> oh, yes. cheryl: give me some specific examples. >> well, that's the funny thing. while being pompous and engaging in this moral training as if they are the champ
they should be guilty because they are democrats and the history of civil rights are black people and republicans fighting democrats. >> can we stop there? yoo my limited history is that it is the republican party going back to reconstruction that tried to lead the way for black representation in congress and later on the clock turns. >> for five minutes. >> and then it is the 60s and the the 70s with the crazy southern democrats. >> it is so awful. they pass the 14th and 15th amendment and throughout the 20s and 30s and 40s. every republican platform included calls for anti-lynching ledgislation which was consistently blocked by the democrats. right after brown versus the board of education, they ran a segregationist on their ticket. and who pushes through the civil rights laws, all the way through until finally in the mid '60s. lbj switches to opposing the civil rights laws. and they cared about the blacks for five minutes and then they mores onto talking about rights for girls that want to have abortions. they have dumped the blacks and moved onto larger voting blocks now. >> i
in the early 1900's when women's right to vote was a central civil rights issue of the country. it is like the campaigns in the 1840's and 1850's and the election of abraham lincoln when the issue of slavery or freedom was a central issue of the country. those local elections before the revolution were similar in the way that they cast the issue as being one in which there is a status of british citizenship and american citizenship. the gap had to be closed. the reason i would bring this up as a candidate -- my platform would be to close at the civil gap. all of us of being in this room being somewhat government professionals know that budgets are not really about money, but civil commitments. budgets are architectures of all of the civil commitment to have made to each other as citizens over many generations. the way in which these commitments a range from national security to air traffic control and to food safety, all of these commitments accumulated year after year very slowly and were reaffirmed and reshaped in the appropriations and budget legislation. families, people came to trust
than our century's worth of progress in civil rights. now the tide is turning. inch by inch, state by state, we've been reclaiming our rights and turning back the wave of voter suppression. we saw it when the justice department stepped in to block the laws in texas, south carolina and florida. we saw it when governors in six states all but one were democrats, vetoed voter i.d. laws. they were champions of democracy to do so. and we saw it when state and federal courts rejected laws in eight states, including today's major ruling in pennsylvania. this morning a judge blocked pennsylvania's controversial voter i.d. from going into effect before the november election. after it was revealed that hundreds of thousands of voters face the real pocket that they would not be allowed to vote. but now this unjust law will not be in effect on election day in this critical swing state. it's a stunning rebuke to republicans and their shameless attempt to rig the system. just remember one of those state top gop lawmakers slipped up and said what these laws are all about. >> voter i.d., which is g
pennsylvania. a whole issue of voter suppression and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. president obama won by 600,000 boats in pennsylvania last time. this really does determine the election. i don't care who you are for. this will determine the election. it is a huge problem or the country. we should be celebrating voters going to the polls, not putting impediments in their way. host: the radio program "democracy now" turns 25 this year? guest: we started in 1996. we were just on radio. the week of september 11, 2001, we started on the first television station in new york city on public access. then it just caught on like wildfire beyond the election and more television stations aired us and radio stations and npr
by a drone. >> hi, i am a holocaust survivor and a civil rights veteran. and what i see happening in this country as they move towards fascism, which very much resembles that of our germany, which silenced pretty much the labor movement, which restrict to voter participation in the media as well. we no longer have the media that takes on the lives that are being spread and that we are being fed on a daily basis. there are very few outlets we can actually read or hear the truth of what is happening in our government. and my fear is that we are going down a really steep and quick ascent into fascism and i think that is very worrisome. and i am a fighter and i have no idea anymore how this can be stopped because i don't see that there is a movement. he says even when it's hopeless, we have to continue to battle, but there doesn't seem to be a cohesive movement like there was in the 60s. do you have any suggestions about how we can go about this or that she would even agree with the aspect of where we are headed. >> if there is enough people who believe that, then at cnn difference in
seems to get all the credit for signing the civil rights act. it was actually eisenhower who got the ball rolling. >> yeah. and for 100 years after the civil war fought by republicans to end slavery, it's republicans constantly introducing civil rights bills that were blocked by democrats? why is it that the 1964 civil rights act is treated as if it's the only civil rights act in u.s. history? because that was the first one in history ever pushed by a democrat. and by the way, lbj, when he was a senator, opposed the 1957 and 1960 civil rights act being pushed by eisenhower and nixon. and if i could just say about chris matthews, as curious as that clip, he cites all the black people coming up to him and cites black people in other country whom he refers to as african-americans. that's because here in america, he doesn't have any black friends. he doesn't have any black neighbors. his son, i have the url and the book, there is a big picture of his son's wedding. 100 people in the church. not a black face in the group. any republican with the facts of chris matthews life would be c
." this is a very old statute enacted by the first congress. it has sat dormant for 170 years. in some civil right type folks picked it up. -- been some civil right type folks picked it up and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign. the defendant is foreign. the tour took place in some foreign place. they say you have jurisdiction over this. courts have been going for this. they have been allowing some of these cases to go forward. this case raised the question of the of -- in this particular case, it took place in nigeria. the guy says the nigerian government committed these against me. they mistreated me. these foreign will company's work implicit -- foreign companies were implicit. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. the defendant say this is not apply to corporations. he cannot actually sue a corporation under the statute. that was their claim. they did something very unusual. they actually said we want to consider a broader question. we would like you to brief not just this question of does it apply to corporations, but also doesn't apply extraterritor
thought stood out. great tape about the civil rights school integration stuff, call with president eisenhower talking about the cuban missile crisis. this was really interesting. kennedy on the optics of sort of being president and how the gop would seize on a photo op and try to take it out of context which doesn't seem like something you would be considering way back in the '60s. let's hear that tape. >> so apparently just as bad even back then. >> i think it was bad back then. there's this tendency to say it's worse than it's ever been. when you look at history all the way back to the founding you realize people were getting beat in the head with kaines on the senate floor and it's always been bad. that said i think kennedy was particularly astute when it came to optics and concerned with it. he was the first modern president in that regard, the one that came of age and owed his exe -- election to some extent to television. he was seeing it as a stage that had to be set and you see that reflected in those comments. >> now we don't need microphones. we just need juicy tell-all --
's been established in 2006. office of civil rights is really looking for agencies to have more of a dbe procedures manual, so the changes to the dbe and sbe plans are really just documenting. this is who we are going to advertise with, this is who we are going to outreach to, this is how we are going to conduct a shortfall and et cetera, et cetera. the two major changes are really that they directed that they not use the availability advisory percentage anymore for the dbe program. they believe that that gives the contracting community the impression that there's an enforceable dbe goal on contracts, so we have honored that directive and taken that out of the dbe plan, but we did note for fta we will still have enforceable goals on the small business side and we would be requiring contractors to meet those goals, or demonstrate good faith efforts to meet those goals. the second change the that since we have established our dbe program we have always reported our dbe participation based on all of our contracts. that is how we have calculated our goal for every period. that is how we have
. we won the olympics, in part, because we've had civil rights laws and the laws that prohibit discrimination against women. i have been for those efforts all my life. the president's record is quite different. the question is our future. president kennedy once said in response to similar arguments, "we are great, but we can be greater.'' we can be better if we face our future, rejoice in our strengths, face our problems, and by solving them, build a better society for our children. thank you. >> thank you, mr. mondale. [applause] please, we have not finished quite yet. thank you, mr. mondale, and thank you, mr. president. and our thanks to our panel members, as well. and so we bring to a close this first of the league of women voters presidential debates of 1984. you two can go at each again in the final league debate on october 21st, in kansas city, missouri. and this thursday night, october 11th, at 9 p.m. eastern daylight time, the vice president, george bush, will debate congresswoman geraldine ferraro in philadelphia. and i hope that you will all watch once again. no matt
win and my retort is if you look back over the years, from women's suffrage, civil rights, to more recently the alternative ener movement, have been borne from third parties garn hing enough votes away from the two major political parties so engrained in the status quo that they never impose the sweeping changes so i hope you can comment on the role of third parties not necessarily in winning elections but in changing the agenda to the point where we get the changes we end up treasuring over the next century. host: thank you for the call. dr. jill stein. guest: thank you for making that point, which is very important. in fact, what so many people call progress in this country, whether you talk about women getting the right to vote, the abbitionist slavery, the protection of workers in the workplace, the right to organize, the 40 hour work week, child labor laws, social social security, the new deal, you name it, all of these have come out of independent third parties, because as you say, the party that is are bought and paid for by large corporations which are part of the status qu
of cases that could change the landscape of civil rights in america. fr frances coe, nbc news. >>> and now here's a look at some other stories making news early today in america. in maine, a group of strangers spring into action when an elderly woman drove her car into the portland harbor. the band of good samaritans pulled the 84-year-old out of her car moments before it sank. the woman is in stable condition. some of the rescuers had to be treated for hypothermia. >>> carmageddon 2 has come to an end just in time for this morning's rush hour in california. the demolition job that shut down a portion of l.a.'s 405 freeway hit a snag when a column collapsed. work crews completed a major component of the four-year expansion project. >>> in kentucky, a test of strength was on display. 34 teams of 20 people battled to see who could pull a 757 cargo plane 12 feet in the fastest time. the competitors showed the money as well as some muscle. all of the teams raised money for the special olympics. >>> finally, hawaiians continued their love affair with spasm hundreds gathered to build the world's
that doesn't have civil rights legislation. i have tried to use the white use the pulpit. we have passed two forward civil rights bills. done by legislation, but i do think you need to make an appeal every time you can eliminate racial divisions and discrimination and i'll keep on doing that and pointing to some legislative aaccomplishment. >> i have to point out something else to say to ross perot, please don't say to the dea agents on the street that we don't have the will to fight drugs. please, i've watched these people. the same for our local enforcement people, we are backing up in every way we possibly can. maybe you met that some in the country don't have the will to fight it but we've been a strong backer. i want to clear that up. >> it's time. >> we have the will to fight it and some have let's go to another . subject. the subject of health. the first question to president for two minutes. >> mr. president, tens of thousands of people paradeed pass the white house to demonstrate their concern about the disease aids, a sell brailted member of your commission imagjohnson saying the
, 10 million! according to a civil rights group called the advancement project, 28 states set up barriers including voter purges, which target alleged non-citizens. according to the report, naturalized latinos are more likely to be falsely identified as non-citizens than any other grooms. strict photo i.d. requirements at the polls. many new laws are being contested. today in federal court in south carolina, they are a challenge to the new photo i.d. law. tomorrow, a judge in pennsylvania is going to consider whether the strict photo i.d. law puts anyone at risk for being disenfranchised. if that answer is yes that judge is going to ever to stop the law from taking effect in november. hundreds of groups, we're going to make sure that nobody is disenfranchised by these new policies, our next guest has been fighting for voting rights for more than 90 years. jeanette is joining us from washington d.c. welcome inside the war room. >> thank you governor granholm. >> you bet. thanks for what you do. the league of women voters had to stop actually registering voters in florida because o
smart. ♪ . >> three months after supreme court justice moved to the right and passed obama care. pete williams has some details. >> reporter: larry, this is shaping up to be a court term dominated by civil rights beginning with a case that will be argued next week on affirmative action, colleges nationwide use it believing that a more racially diverse campus provides a better education. the court gave a green light to that practice seven years ago, but since then has become more skeptical. sandra day o'connor who has since left the court. the court will almost certainly hear a challenge to the voting rights act. the section that says states have to get federal permission before they make any changes to their elections if those states have a history of discrimination. the states say the map that's used to determine how they need to get that clearance is out of date and three years ago the court agreed with that. and almost certainly it will take up the challenge to the defense of marriage act. that's the act signed by president clint preside president clinton that says that -- >> many
presidents do. on civil rights, especially, there was a lot of movement from 1962, when the tapes start to 1963. it was all changing. the white house had swung very much behind the civil rights movement in the fall of 1963. >> he was very involved in the minut minutia, like our other boss, president clinton. >> exactly. incredible moment in august 28th, 1963, the great martin luther king speech "i have a dream" had just happened and they had a political strategy session where president kennedy went through all the members of the house and senate and what he thought their likelihood was to support civil rights. it was clear, he was on their side, driving it forward. >> there's a little clip that exposes a personal side of the president as well. let's play that. >> i wanted to do back to jordan marsh. >> all right, sir. i want that follow's incompetent who had his picture taken in next to mrs. kennedy's bed. he is a silly bastard. i wouldn't have him running a cat house. >> he is furious over a $5,000 bill for a hospital room, right? sn>> a timely expenditure built for a legitimate reason
know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegrated the armed wt tr. appointed all the federal judges that desegregated the south. he believed in moving, as john was saying, with a hidden hand. that's true on civil rights as well. he's been unfairly criticized for being weak on civil rights. he was not as strong as he could havebeen, but he did ts poant. w >> let's talk, presidential historian, jon meacham, who has a book coming out after the election that's forthcoming. "thomas jefferson, t.j." ike, a good president? a ar great president? or a great president? think that he -- one of the things we haven't talked about on the domestic side is he ratified what franklin roosevelt and harry truman had done in that he could have created --n 1952, 3,it cle,think, and check me on this, evan, was such that if he had been really intent on rolling back the new deal and the fair deal, it would ve been a huge fight and would h
code at the university of north carolina. >> all speech must be civil. and that feels right. why not have nice speech? but the civil rights movement and the protests sitting on a lunch hall and refusing to leave on a lunch counter because they're racist, it's important not to be civil all the time. >> bill: if i go down there and i call somebody a pinhead, am i arrested by the campus police? >> you, according to their code, would be kicked out of school. >> bill: is that right? wow! >> probably wouldn't do it for pinhead. >> bill: wow. i bet you they would if it were me. i bet you they would. >> you do much worse. >> bill: the guys in "animal house" they're not going to the university of north carolina. that's not happening. that movie could have never been made if all the colleges had these. >> these codes are since animal house. in response to "animal house." >> bill: tell them time coming down if they don't knock it off. when we come right back, strange twist to a strange case of welfare fraud. the woman who committed it was a big lottery winner and now she's done. legal is ne
laws because it opens businesses up to frivolous lawsuits, because we already have civil rights legislation to take care of anti-discrimination law. they don't usually come out and say it's about freedom, it's a business's right to pay women less for equal work. romney may not support todd akin but we should ask him hough he feels about this legislation that todd akin, if he's elected, will be voting on. >> this is one race the republicans early on are expected to win. john cornyn saying he doesn't think it's winnable. can akin win this race? >> i think it's possible. missouri is one of the only swing states that mccain still polled out last time when he lost ohio and other places. there's been a lot of improvement in the polls but neither candidate has ever moved very far past 50%. so that tells you that even with everything jamming up the system, this is a close race. >> but he apologized once for his remark about women, legitimate rape. and now he has come out of -- saying employers shouldn't have to pay women the same money in the workplace. >> so often the defense is -- we
's" top five. in 1962, 29-year-old veteran named james meredith took a giant step for civil rights when he became the first black student at the university of mississippi. at the time segregation was still the norm across much of the south. mississippi's governor and lt. governor had lock mr.ed james meredith from enrollment not once but three times. then a federal court stepped in and gave the okay. thousands of white stiewntsdz and others responded with large scale riots. tear glass filled the air at least two people died. u.s. marshals surrounded the student as he walked across campus to his first day of class now, the machine different story. minorities make up 24% of the student body and there is a statue to the man who changed ole miss forever 50 years ago today and no you know the news for this monday, october the 1st, 2012 i'm shepard smith. we're back tom
released audiotapes that show kennedy's real views on the civil rights movement, cuban missile crisis and george romney. all of that when "now" starts in a mere 180 seconds. want to try to crack it? yeah, that's the way to do it! now we need a little bit more... a little bit more vanilla? this is great! [ male announcer ] at humana, we believe there's never been a better time to share your passions... because the results... are you having fun doing this? yeah. that's a very nice cake! [ male announcer ] well, you can't beat them. [ giggles ] ohh! you got something huh? whoa... [ male announcer ] humana understands the value of spending time together that's a lot of work getting that one in! let's go see the birdies. [ male announcer ] one on one, sharing what you know. let's do it grandpa. that's why humana agents will sit down with you, to listen and understand what's important to you. it's how we help you choose the right humana medicare plan for you. because when your medicare is taken care of, you can spend more time sharing your passions. wow. [ giggles ] [ male announ
civil rights. when you define liberal and conservative, people support medicare with all their hearts and they do like this stuff, they like that we have a mixed capitalism with some social welfare mixed in to soften it and that makes them practical people and makes them liberal in a sense of functionality but not, i'm a liberal. your thoughts? >> you know, i agree. chris, two things have happened over the course of the last 20, 30 years. you have this slow turning away from the ideas of the new deal, at least from other people. the notions that these are ha handouts when it applies to other people, just by default, any democratic that gets elected, it was illegitimate. and then clinton comes along, he's ichlt llegit. >> he did win and i would think that there was this notion that bill clinton was inherently illegitimate and nothing too extreme to dislodge him from the white house because he was de-facto illegitimate. and i think with barack obama, this notion that this could not have happened. this was a nightmare inflicted on us by a.c.o.r.n. >> you are so funny. you have the cartoo
, georgia congressman and civil rights icon john lewis compared some voter i.d. statutes to literacy tests and poll taxes that kept blacks from voting for years in the south. >> i've seen this before. i lived this before. too many people struggled, suffered, and died to make this possible for every american to exercise their right to vote. ( applause ) >> suarez: nationwide pennsylvania is now one of 33 states with voter identification laws. it's one of five states with strict photo i.d. laws. the statutes have spawnd at least 15 legal challenges over everything from voter i.d. to early voting to culling voter rolls. in florida, the state republican party has filed a fraud complaint against the company it hired to register voters. as of friday at least 10 counties have spotted possibly fraudulent forms turned in by the firm. back in pennsylvania another eye peel to the state supreme court remains possible. in the meantime, the new rules have already been modified, prompting new coalitions to form with the aim of helping voters navigate the confusion. for more on how voter i.d. for more on
guaranteed act, on par with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have never been set up to be fair. what they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. once.ed for ross p
with the civil-rights of the 1960's. host: john from illinois. john is an independent. hey there. caller: the only problem that i have is about the tax issue. the reason why i say that is our taxes in this country have neverwhat they were set up for was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes. working-class and the port were supposed to pay the majority of theirs in homeowners' taxes, city and state taxes -- ordering class and the poor. everything is out of sorts. when you are on fixed income and these states will have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government will have such a lower one. anybody i fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator that costs $400, will have about a $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. the ones it will hurt our people that are retired, people that are on disability, things like that. otherwise, i am completely in line with you. i voted for ron paul in 1988. i voted for paul brown. i think he -- i can remember what year it was that he ran as a libertarian. i voted for ross perot once. i am
with civil rights of the '60s. >> host: john is from illinois now. john is an independent. hi there. >> caller: hi. mr. johnson, the only problem i have is about the tax issue. and the reason why it's like -- the reason why i say that is, our taxes in this country have never been set at actually to be fair. what they were set up for originally was that the rich were supposed to pay the majority of their taxes in federal taxes, and the working class and the poor were supposed to pay most of -- the majority of theirs in home owners taxes, city and state taxes. and that has been all -- it's got everything out of sorts. my problem with what everybody calls a fair tax is, when you're on a fixed income, and these states are going to have to have such a high tax rate because the federal government is going to have such a lower one, that when anybody that is on a fixed tax rate goes in and buys a refrigerator, they cost $400, the lowest one they can buy, they have about $100 tax on the refrigerator. that is the problem. and the only ones it's going to hurt is people that are retired, people
, they give a lot of money to civil- rights organizations like jesse jackson and the n.a.a.c.p. i am one who supports pumping capital into the community so we can create jobs and small businesses. the young lady is on point with that. it has been an uphill battle for me to get african-americans to see in general that it is the new civil rights challenge. i'm so glad the banks do have regulation, because they tend to exploit black and brown communities. i'm so glad are our alternatives community banks and credit unions now. keep up the good work, young lady. thank you. host: for more information about what your group is doing and you are the director of the program, ptrust.org is one of the websites. caller: a lady called about not being able to have a bank account because there was a minimum balance she had to maintain. i belonged tour credit union for years and the minimum balance is $5. when my children were in high school, they wanted to manage their own money and put their money in wachovia. my daughter had a conniption when she put a hundred dollars in and the next time she made a depos
that blatantly went the wrong way because of a ref's call. our most important civil-rights is voting. it is what everything else relies on. this is not a casual thing. even if it does not turn an election. in a state that is solidly blue or solidly red -- whether or not it changes the outcome. as with the nfl refs, it did get settled very quickly after everybody on national television saw a game go the wrong way, and, tragically, it may take something like that for voter i.d. and voter suppression to get the attention it deserves. >> michael onesteel joined in. -- michael wants to join in. >> i have no idea what the right percentage should be, but it is under 1%. another topic that is way down that we believe should be more of the coverage is money in politics, the fund raising. it is just a sliver of the percentage. one of the things we are trying to do with our project is to bring awareness to these types of issues from a data perspective, so it is not just anecdotal. i think we all know about it, but is it being given enough percentage of coverage is i think a legitimate question. >> or what
. >> it is the most important election in the modern history of this country. we've got civil rights on the line. we've got human rights on the ne. >> reporter: 31 states currently have laws in place th will require voters to show i.d. at the polls in novbe voting rights activeists say ste laws are disproportionately targeting minorities saying these laws have proven to be costly, ineffective and unnecessary. >> proponents say they prevent fraud at the voting booth. but activists know these laws are also likely to lead to reduced voter turnout. in addition a recent study found nearly half of the nation's states have new voting measure that could stop some latinos from heading to the polls in november. some states are using inaccurate or ated citizenship lists. inome cases rerecently natulized cits purged from those lists. >> what we do object to is very narrow requirements that place burdens on poor people, on the elderly, on people of color or ethnic groups that make it harderfo the to vote. >> reporter: for john hazelwood, his decision to register vote is driven by a simple motivation. >> i'm in
question front and center unlike in the civil rights and the feminists and many of the important movement of our time where there was fear of going in that direction, it would split people, they weren't ready for it, the police would be angry and all the rest of it. this is a movement that said, no, no, no, we're putting the question of the 1% right front and center. that opens a space that i have since filled, that this book is not doable without the space opened by occupy wall street for the interest. if i'm correct in understanding, this is now in its third printing, and it only appeared in may of this year. that -- the thanks go to the people like the occupy wall street people who are willing to break from the tradition not to be limited by the tweedledum, tweedledee either/or republican and democrat and are willing to now push in another direction. >> well, another question on the occupy movement is, was asked about, well, what's happened to it? it seems to have gone into some kind of reis access or stasis. recess or stasis. >> a great political leader of the left whose name i won't
to end that civil war right now. >>shepard: thank you, jonathan hunt. thank you very much. joining us is a official intelligence officer for the defense secretary's office, mike barrett, currently c.e.o. of a consulting firm in washington, dc. president morsi of egypt had a little bit for everyone. some condemnation of us. some condemnation for the civil war. also, words for iran. what did you think? >>guest: it is important we in the west understand this issue about freedom of speech. this is an important thing. it will come back. we saw with the cartoons a few years ago, a notion there are things you cannot do. we in the west have freedoms but that is not the reality on the arab street. with morsi, what we are seeing is a reflection of what that part of the world feels like. we have to figure out how to deal with it. it is a reality in foreign policy we will have to deal with post arab spring. >>shepard: i read a couple of articles equating it to fire in a crowded theater, making the argument or should not be able to do something under freedom of speech that is absolutely going to i
: it is a scene played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter id laws. >> the effort to change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wednesdndy wiser s hundreds of voters may not have the right id. the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos. groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we have to make sure there is no fraud in our elections. we should not pass laws that are unnecessary that exclude people from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter id laws protect against voter impersonation. it's a problem, says john fun, an expert on the subject. >> if someone walks in and votes in the name of a dead person, they don't have to show id, how likely is that dead person to intervene? >> reporter: the justice department or state and federal courts have block td this in three states. texas, wisconsin, south carolina, which is currently appealing. pennsylvania is pending. alabama and mississippi need the green light from the justice department. of the eight, only t
. megyn: just ahead, america's most prominent civil right group is asking the united nations to investigate what it calls racist voting laws in the united states. the controversial case in today's "kelly's court." one senator is calling it benghazi gait. the growing questions about the killings of four americans in libya and how the white house characterized it from the days since. we'll have reaction from the former white house chief of stop andy card. >> al qaeda sacks an embassy and kills an ambassador. the administration didn't want to admit it. the administration thinking if it stringt out long enough the media would let it slide. [ male announcer ] sponges take your mark. [ female announcer ] one drop of ultra daw has twice the everyday grease cleaning ingredients eading non-concentrated brand... to clean 2x more greasy dishes. dawn does more. so it's not a chore. megyn: 2:31 in the east. back to our top story. several deputy kralts on the senate foreign relations committee have joined republicans sending a lower the state department asking what kind of intelligence we
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